Saturday. 26.11.2022
TERRORISM

Mass murderer Breivik highlights right-wing ties in parole hearing

Breivik entered the courtroom carrying a laptop bag with a right-wing message and displayed a Nazi salute

18 January 2022, Norway, Skien: Anders Behring Breivik (C), convicted of terrorism after killing 77 people in July 2011, arrives for the first day of trial in the temporary courtroom at Skien Prison, where his application for early release is being heard by the Telemark District Court. Photo: Ole Berg-Rusten/ntb/dpa.
Anders Behring Breivik (C), convicted of terrorism after killing 77 people in July 2011, arrives for the first day of trial in the temporary courtroom at Skien Prison, where his application for early release is being heard by the Telemark District Court. Photo: Ole Berg-Rusten/dpa.

Convicted Norwegian terrorist Anders Behring Breivik used a parole hearing on Tuesday to parade his far-right views, prompting a judge to at least once admonish him against using the proceedings to showcase his racist worldview.

Breivik - who has since changed his name to Fjotolf Hansen, but asked to go by his birth name during the proceedings - was convicted in 2012 of killing 77 people during a pair of 2011 attacks: a bombing outside the prime minister's office, followed by an attack on the island of Utoya, where he systematically tracked down young people at a political summer camp while dressed as a police officer.

It was the worst terrorist attack in Norwegian history. Breivik has remained unapologetic for the attacks, claiming he was protecting Norwegian society.

The Oslo District Court in 2012 sentenced him to 21 years - the maximum possible at the time. The sentence also came with a "preventive detention" clause that allows him to be kept behind bars even after 21 years if he is deemed a continued threat to society - meaning he could die in prison.

However, the terms of his original sentence required that, after 10 years in jail, he receive regular reviews to see if his continued incarceration was necessary. Judges will spend the next three days weighing whether Breivik would be a menace to society if freed. Prosecutors are pushing for him to remain behind bars.

A right-wing message

Breivik, now 42, entered the courtroom - a converted sports hall at the Skien prison - carrying a laptop bag with a right-wing message written on it in front of him. He then displayed a Nazi salute - a straightened arm with the fingers extended - linked to the World War II-era Nazi regime in Germany.

Judget Dag Bjorvik then asked him to refrain from holding up political banners during the proceedings.

Tuesday starts with prosecutor's arguments, followed by statements by the defence and then what is expected to be an extended statement from Breivik.

Mass murderer Breivik highlights right-wing ties in parole hearing
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