Thursday 10/28/21
EARTHQUAKES

La Palma volcano eruption triggers new evacuations

Most of the evacuees have been taken in by friends or relatives in other parts of the island, or are staying in hotels
19 September 2021, Spain, La Palma: Lava and smoke are seen following the eruption of the volcano Cumbre Vieja on the Canary island of La Palma. A volcano erupted on the Spanish island of La Palma on Sunday, with several explosions in the El Paso municipality in the south of the island forcing at least 2000 people to flee the area, according to local media. Photo: Arturo Jimenez/dpa
Lava and smoke are seen following the eruption of the volcano Cumbre Vieja on the Canary island of La Palma. Photo: Arturo Jimenez/dpa.

More people have been ordered to leave their homes due to advancing lava on the Spanish island of La Palma, where a volcano began erupting more than three weeks ago.

Between 700 and 800 people have been told to gather at an assembly point with their pets and belongings by 7 pm, the Pevolca emergency committee announced on Twitter.

Depending on developments, people would possibly be able to return to their homes accompanied by security personnel to rescue any other belongings in the coming days, Pevolca wrote on Twitter.

So far, around 6,000 people have had to leave their homes. Most have been taken in by friends or relatives in other parts of the island, or are staying in hotels.

Just hours ahead of the evacuation order, curfews affecting around 3,000 people were lifted in the same area, near the industrial zone of Callejon de la Gata.

It had been feared on Monday that dangerous chemicals could be released when lava with a temperature of up to 1,200 degrees set fire to several businesses, including a cement factory.

Eruption more violent

The volcano, which has no official name, erupted on September 19 for the first time in 50 years. The eruption became more violent in recent days, with repeated explosions throwing magma in the air, while smoke rose several kilometres high.

So far, up to 1,000 buildings have been destroyed and the island's agriculture and industry has suffered serious damage.

Most of the lava has been flowing into the Atlantic ocean, creating a new strip of land. Meanwhile, two new flows have developed, heading northwards through the island's industrial zone.

A series of small to medium-strength earthquakes have also shaken the island off the western coast of Africa. Since early Monday, around 120 earthquakes have been registered, reaching a magnitude of up to 4.1, the RTVE state broadcaster reported.

Comments